Register Now

Login

Lost Password

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link and will create a new password via email.

Login

Register Now

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Morbi adipiscing gravdio, sit amet suscipit risus ultrices eu. Fusce viverra neque at purus laoreet consequa. Vivamus vulputate posuere nisl quis consequat.

How can I make sure I have enough, but not too much Creatine?

Creatine doesn’t just come from supplements. You can increase the level of creatine in your diet by consuming various types of meat. Lamb, chicken, and turkey are good sources of creatine, offering 2 to 3 grams per serving cooked. Organic and free-range meats tend to have higher creatine levels than other domestic meats. A three-ounce serving of fish is another good source of creatine, with wild-caught fish having the most. Wild game also has naturally high levels of creatine, so if you consume venison and duck, for example, you’re already getting decent amounts of creatine.

Vegetarians have a bit harder time improving natural levels of creatine, but they can do so by consuming foods high in the amino acids that make up creatine: argine, glycine, and methionine. Oats, peanuts, and soybeans are good sources for these amino acids, as are spinach, seaweed, and sesame seeds.

The phenomenon of “too much of a good thing” applies to creatine. While it’s necessary for good muscle performance and bodily energy use, too much can stress the kidneys, quash sex drive, and even result in erectile dysfunction. Your best bet is to ensure you get sufficient creatine through the foods you eat, and if you choose to take supplements, be sure to inform your doctor, particularly if taking creatine causes any of the side effects listed above.

About the Author